Review of the AT&T 3G MicroCell

As reported here and here AT&T released their new 3G MicroCell yesterday in the Charlotte test market.  Hey!  That’s where I live!  I’ve been waiting on this device for a while.  Ask anyone I work with how my cell coverage is at home and you’ll find out it’s abysmal.  Calls are short, frustrating, and futile.  For once I won’t blame AT&T for this.  I live in a low area in my neighborhood and both GSM and CDMA coverage is very bad.  I tried a repeater when the iPhone first shipped with very limited success.  The 3GS iPhone appears better but many times I’ll get a “You have a new voicemail!” notice when my phone never rang.  Frustrating.

Enter the new MicroCell from AT&T.  This is not a repeater, it’s more like a Cell-to-VoIP seamless gateway.  You plug it in to your broadband connection and it acts as a small cell tower in your house.  Your 3G AT&T devices connect to that box directly and all calls and are routed out over your Internet connection.  So even if you have zero coverage you can use this box, unlike a repeater that needs a signal to amplify.  If you originate a call on the MicroCell it will also be handed off to a normal AT&T tower if you leave your house.

Again, I bought this on the day of release in a test market.  When I bought it there was extra paperwork to fill out.  I gave them my contact information so an AT&T rep could call me in a few days to get my purchase, install, and usage experience opinion.  They made sure I lived in the supported area which included Mecklenburg County (Charlotte) as well as a few surrounding counties.  I actually bought my unit from the AT&T store in Salisbury on the way back from a customer.  My sales rep, Nathan, was very helpful and mentioned they had sold 5 or so already that day.  Salisbury isn’t a big town so it shows the anticipation for the device.

Information on the AT&T site for the device is here.  Excuse the fact they have audio with no warning.  Bad AT&T!  Bad!

Cost

There has been some discrepancy on the cost of the device and how it works.  The unit itself is $149.  If you just want to use your cell plan minutes there is no additional monthly fee.  You buy the box and you’re good to go.  That’s what I did.  If you don’t want to use your plan minutes you can get an unlimited plan.  This is useful for people who want to go cell only and I might make that move again now that our iPhones work in the house.  If you don’t have any other AT&T services the unlimited plan is $20/month and you get a $100 mail-in rebate on the device taking it down to $49.  If you have your Internet or voice through AT&T the price goes down to $10/month.  If you have both Internet and voice through AT&T the plan is free.  I need to see if they require VoIP with U-Verse for that plan or a plain AT&T POTS line meets the requirements.  We use U-Verse for Internet and an AT&T POTS for voice so I may get the plan for free anyway.  Do the math for your minute usage and see what works for you.

What You Get for $150

The picture below shows you everything you get when you buy the device.

DSC00707

The basics:

  • The 3G MicroCell Unit
  • Yellow Ethernet Cable
  • A/C Power Supply
  • Quickstart Guide
  • User Manual
  • License Agreement

Your not going to easily hide this device or have it blend in.  It’s white, gray, and AT&T orange.  Here is a picture to give you an idea of scale with my iPhone next to it.  It’s like my AT&T U-Verse router, a good bit larger than I think it needs to be.

DSC00709

Installation

The installation is very easy.  The quickstart guide walks you through everything.  The key is that you have to activate it on the AT&T website first before you can use it.  I imagine some stores will do this for you at time of purchase but I did mine myself at home.  When you get home you’ll unbox the device, go to the AT&T wireless site, and activate the MicroCell.  You’ll need the serial number of your MicroCell and the phone numbers you want to activate on the device.  It’s all done through a wizard-like process.  Picture below shows the management screen.

Screen shot 2009-09-22 at 10.24

You’ll notice a list of authorized devices.  AT&T allows you to put up to 10 devices on the authorized list.  At any one time the MicroCell can have 4 active voice/data sessions.  So four people can be talking, or two talking and two checking email.

Once you activate the device on your account the only thing left is to plug it in.  Here is a shot of the back of the MicroCell.  Oh yes, one more thing.  This device has a GPS in it.  What?  That’s right.  AT&T does this so you can’t buy one here in the US and take it to Europe and use it with your phone there.  So, it needs to get a GPS signal.  Mine is on my second floor about 8 feet from a window and has no issue.  If you put yours in a basement it might be a concern.  There is a GPS light on the front to let you know if it can’t get a lock.  Annoying for some, I’m sure.

DSC00710

Connecting the device is very simple.  There are two Ethernet ports on the back.  One marked Ethernet and one marked Computer.  If you aren’t using a router or firewall (and you should be!) you can plug your cable modem in to the Ethernet-marked port and your computer in to the Computer port.  If you have a router or switch just connect the unit from the switch to the Ethernet-marked jack.  AT&T does let you put the device in-line between your cablemodem (or DSL modem) and your router/firewall.  This is “Option C” as named in the User Manual.  The idea here is that the MicroCell can prioritize your cell traffic over data.  I haven’t tested this yet…I don’t know how it affects NAT translation yet.  My network, being the geek I am, is more complex than most so I’m not worrying about it yet.  With my U-Verse 18Mb/1.5Mb connection I haven’t had any issues even when doing large downloads.

So once you’ve plugged in the data cables and the power cable the device will boot.  It takes a few minutes and the first time it might reboot as it is configured to go find the latest firmware and update itself.  There is no management of the device itself.  I checked my DHCP logs and saw the IP it was assigned.  There is no web interface.  You can telnet to the device but I have no way of knowing the login credentials.  It’s pretty hands-off.  Below is a picture of the device once it is booted and operational.

DSC00714

Does It Work?

Yes.  It appears to work pretty well.  Here is a shot of my iPhone before the MicroCell.

IMG_0026

Here is one with the new MicroCell.

IMG_0027

I’ve had several calls on my phone since switching and the difference is night and day.  Before my phone wouldn’t even ring half the time and I’d just get a voicemail notification.  That hasn’t happened at all.  Clarity seems to be the same as a normal call.  No problems either switching to and from the MicroCell.

Conclusion

AT&T  has caught a bit of flack for this device and the price, especially before people understood the unlimited voice plan.  The #1 problem with the iPhone for most people is AT&T and in many cases I agree with that.  But in my case at home AT&T really isn’t the problem.  I can drive two blocks in any direction and get 4 bars no problem, it’s just where my house physically sits that causes the signal drop.  To me this device is perfect.  It’s not a repeater.  It doesn’t require installation of an antenna.  It sits on my desk in my office and provides 5 bars of 3G everywhere in the house.  I don’t even know it’s there.  Would I be happier with a $99 price point?  Sure, but $150 is a good investment in the productivity I’ll get back when coworkers or customers call me on my cell phone.  You’ll have to do  your own math to decide if the unlimited plans are worth it for you.  Unless I can get it free I won’t bother as we don’t go over our minutes anyway and have plenty in the rollover bank.

Update 1:

Had some questions.  Below is a screenshot from the speedtest.net app with the MicroCell:

IMG_0028

Range seems adequate.  I can go to the end of my driveway and have 2 bars.  You won’t be able to cover a large backyard or pool with the device in the house, but it should cover you on a deck or patio next to the house.  Basically, once I got outside I lost a bar about every 20 or 30 feet.  That’s with the unit in my office with 3 walls and the outside brick between us.

There is a GPS antenna jack on the back of the unit so if you can’t get a signal you can run a small antenna.

69 Comments

  1. I have been watching this release with anticipation. I have a similar situation to yours and was looking at this as a decent solution. Thanks for the review! Now, if AT&T will just roll out to locations about 5 hours west of you!

  2. Thanks for the review. I live in a similar area, where range is fine JUST outside my house, but drops off quite a bit inside the house. I wonder if they’ll soon combine this product w/ a standard router / modem.

  3. This might be a stupid question but…how can you have no 3G or EDGE connection but live in an adequate place to have a broadband connection for the Microcell to work? Thanks!

    • I live in a low part of my neighborhood. I bet I can walk up the hill of my road 200 yards and get a signal fine. I’m not way out..just geography.

    • Erik @ 4.40pm … I live in Silicon Valley where broadband abounds aplenty however, as an example, in Mountain View, around Shoreline & Central intersections including some apts where several friends live, outside there is 1 bar of signal on any ATT device and inside an apt you basically have to give up. Even outside you can often make a call and it will just drop. For the locale, that is abjectly absurd. Silicon Valley should be saturated by every carrier, like a well-slathered piece of toast, by every carrier yet there are numerous poor & dead zones, and others where ATT towers are overloaded or your device will keep trying to get 3G, drop to EDGE, rinse, repeat etc and just wipe out your battery.

    • Yes, very silly question.

      Every house I’ve been in the past decade has had plenty of broadband options. And every one has been “in a hole” as far as cell service goes. One bar at best in the house, literally go a few hundred yards up the street and then the signal is fine. Seems to be my fate.

      So broadband availability and in-house cell signal strength do not correlate at all.

  4. Not bad. Interesting to see that it has GPS too, and not just IP geolocation to find out your location. I suppose GPS is a bit better, as you could always route through a proxy otherwise.

    I’d like to see O2 do this in the UK too. Where I am, I can get a pretty decent EDGE signal (3-4 bars usually), but the 3G signal is quite shocking – it varies between 1 and 2 bars depending on the wind direction and the mood of the Queen.

  5. Nice review. The timeliness makes it all the more valuable since you’re in a test area. However, AT&T website explains the GPS feature used for E911 not for oversees use. Thankfully, I’ve got great reception at home in the NYC metro area but interesting nonetheless. This could be a plus in office buildings (metal/concrete) too.

    • I’ve heard conflicting information on the GPS. They make sure you know to update your address in your account if you move as that is supposedly where E911 gets your information. Either way, the system won’t finish booting without a full GPS signal.

  6. I don’t know about all this, but that’s a sweet pic of your Jeep.

    • Thanks. :) Was taken at Windrock, TN.

  7. Thanks for the review. Setting this up for a friend on Thursday and hoping I don’t have to put it RIGHT next to the window.

    • I’m 8′ or so from a window and have no issues at all. My iPhone gets a signal all day.

  8. I knew it….as soon as I saw “Jason” mentioned in the Engadget summary, I figured it was you!

    Good run-down.

    Take care,

    Nathan Dent

  9. Thanks for the great review, I’m eager for the device to be released in my area. I work in a basement about 20 ft underground and can get no cellphone signal with any provider. Do you think the device will be able to get a IP location to satisfy the initiation process, or is GPS necessary? If GPS is necessary, do you have any idea if it is only required for initiation or if it periodically polls its GPS coordinate while its on? If the former, I imagine I could easily initation the device outside via a battery back-up UPS device and move it down into my office. If you have any experience with that kind of routine, please let us know! Thanks again!

  10. Is this device firmware upgradeable?

    Will it be compatible with 7.2 service or better?

    Will it be upgradable — for compatibility with LTE?

    Or is it destined to be rendered obsolete in two years?

    • It autoupdates firmware itself. No idea on LTE or 7.2. 7.2 would be nice but voice is my primary concern in the house. In the house I do WiFi for data anyway.

  11. Hello fellow Charlottean!

    I’m curious how non-authorized devices react. Do they just ignore the Microcell altogether? Or do they connect but get denied?

    • Correct. They just stay on the AT&T service (if there is a signal).

  12. I’m pretty sure that the real reason for the GPS is so that the authorities can trace the geolocation of cellphone calls.

  13. For those of you who may not be able to place the device near a window, you may be able to plug the MicroCell to a UPS, sync with AT&T and get a GPS lock while near a window, and when the MicroCell is working properly, unplug the UPS and move both to a different location. I think that once the MicroCell has a GPS lock, it will maintain the connection until the next power-down and you will have to re-sync.

    By using a UPS to keep the device powered, you may be able to maintain your AT&T MicroCell connection as you move the device to a more convenient location. Of course, if your MicroCell ever loses power in the future, you will have to repeat the process of moving everything and re-establishing your GPS lock and connection to the AT&T network. And you will have to leave the MicroCell connected to the UPS to keep your connection alive.

  14. I dont understand this product. I thought the Iphone can connect through a wifi connection (if available) when normal reception is bad?

    • It can, but this is mainly for voice calls. Yes, it does 3G data, but mainly, it’s there for voice.

    • Like he said. I use WiFi for my data at home anyway. This, for me, is all about voice.

  15. So I am a bit of a novice to this device or concept. Why does it need your internet connection? Is it using VOIP for to move the voice traffic from your Cell Phone?

    • They have minimum requirements on the site for bandwidth. From your cell to the gateway is just normal cell communication..no VoIP or anything special. I assume it’s VoIP from that box to the AT&T service. I need to put a sniffer on it when I get a chance.

      • It’s not VoIP.

  16. LTE migration and compatibility will more than likely be a firmware upgrade or “hot swap” of the device for some nominal cost.

    • I don’t think so, because there is totally different physical layer, WCDMA uses CDMA and LTE uses OFDMA. You need different front-end hardware to run LTE.

  17. Nice Review. Thank you. So what do you think of buying and activating this in the approved test area, then moving it to another AT&T service area – say several states away from the test area?? I am assuming any GPS checking would be done during the activation process. While I know it needs a lock upon powering up, I just keep thinking that it will be a go – post activation. I know that E-911 would not function as designed, but that is not a concern I have.

    • I don’t know..but I have some friends that want to find out. So we might. :)

  18. Thanks for the review.

    I wish they would drop the GPS and the price correspondingly! It is silly to have to pay money to get ones mobile phone to work in ones own home. Nevertheless, I’m waiting to get one of these in NJ. It will pay for itself within 6 months if I drop my land line.

  19. I’ve been waiting on this unit ever since I bought my iPhone and discovered that I had one bar to nothing at my home in South Georgia. I sure wish they were testing it around here. AT&T’s coverage map said I had good coverage, but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

  20. Jason,

    Great review – thanks – quick question: When you are connected to both the MicroCell and your normal wifi router simultaneously, does the iPhone still default to wifi for data (just like it would if you had wifi at home and a good signal)? Or does it use the MicroCell for data as long as it is connected to it? I don’t suppose it would matter either way if the data speeds were the same… If it stays on MicroCell, does that slow down data at all vs. wifi?

    Thanks again -

    • My phone still uses WiFi for data. I disabled it for the screenshots just to make it cleaner. So, for me, I use the MicroCell for voice and my normal WiFi for all data.

    • John,

      I’ve heard from folks at Apple that WiFi uses more power, so it would appear to be preferable to have the 3G connection take precedence. However, this is opposite the normal protocol. Very interesting question! Will be very interested to hear Jason’s answer.

      David

  21. Is the $100 rebate only if you are subscribed to a PAID “AT&T Unlimited MicroCell Calling” plan? I already have AT&T home phone and internet service, and subscribe to a Unity plan.

    Thanks for the review.

    • That’s my understanding.

  22. Can you set it up so that any device can connect? It would be nice if friends that swing by could use it without having to go through extra steps to approve them. I have a 25/15mbps FiOS connection so bandwidth is no problem.

    • No. All devices have to be authorized.

  23. So, do they make you pay for data-usage when connected to the miniCell? (although you’re using your own broadband??)

    • Not sure. I use WiFi at home..and I have unlimited data anyway.

  24. They sell you cell service and provide bad coverage over your home. They then charge you $20/month and a device charge to take traffic off of their pricey spectrum and expensive sites just to route the traffic over YOUR broadband connection. You are financing the provider and giving them a business case not to build better coverage. It all stems from them providing poor service. The result is you paying more money to get a service that should have been provided inherently when you bought the cell phone. We live in the dark ages.

    • You only pay $20/month if you want unlimited minutes…or you do like I am and just use your plan minutes. A lot of people, like me, have great service near them but due to hills and trees and whatever they can’t get a signal at the specific spot they want. Unless AT&T puts a tower in my back yard they won’t help me. GSM and CDMA coverage at my place is the same. It’s well worth a one time fee of $150.

  25. Anyone know if this will work with Satellite broadband?Cable does not serve my rural area so this would be perfect if that will work. Thanks for the review.

    • I’ve used the Verizon/Samsung microcell over 1.5Mbit/s Hughesnet satellite. Data and texting work great. You can set up a call, and the caller can usually hear you. But the return path is usually not of sufficient quality to have a conversation.

  26. On the subject of WiFi vs 3G Can you run the speedtest with wifi – “3G turned off”.. It would be interesting to see the difference. Ideal would be using a typical network outside your geeky network configuration ;)

    Quote “My network, being the geek I am, is more complex than most so I’m not worrying about it yet. “

  27. On the subject of WiFi vs 3G Can you run the speedtest with wifi – “3G turned off”.. It would be interesting to see the difference. Ideal would be run both speed tests using a typical network outside your geeky network configuration ;)

    Quote “My network, being the geek I am, is more complex than most so I’m not worrying about it yet. “

    • I ran the same speedtest on my WiFi and got 1965Kb/s upload and 1472Kb/s download. The WiFi part of my network isn’t complicated. That’s connected to my 18Mb/1.5Mb AT&T U-Verse Internet.

  28. Hey Jason -

    I installed a MicroCell for my friend the other day. She hasn’t used it much and it’s already dropped one of the few calls she made. When she looked it had gone to zero bars.

    How has it been working out for you? I’m worried that her AT&T DSL is somewhat unreliable and will be a continued problem.

    Do you have Time Warner for Internet?

    Have you had any dropped calls while using the MicroCell?

    Thanks for any info…

    • Just re-read and saw you have U-Verse. They have that on my street, very tempting…

  29. I wonder why Charlotte would be first to get this device.
    Because ATT really sucks here.
    Also, the MicroCell is not working so good for me.
    If you are currently losing calls when the iPhone suddenly loses 3G connectivity (for no reason whatsoever) then the MicroCell isn’t going to help that.
    The MicroCell works great as long as I’m connected to it.
    But I lose 3G connectivity and lose connectivity the MicroCell and I’m standing 1 foot from it.
    This thing is going back to the ATT store.
    Please god let Verizon have the iPhone then ATT can properly DIE.

  30. Alsome review of this product, I was wondering how, and if it worked. Great job. I will be getting one of these today thanks to your great product review!

  31. Hey,

    Could you post the FCCID off of the bottom of the device or from the box? It should be near the mac & serial number.

    Thanks,
    Panic

  32. Hey there – thanks for the info –

    Quick question – can you seamlessly roam on and off the Microcell? Meaning, if you initiate a call in the house and then get in the car and drive away, will it switch over to the ATT network without dropping the call? Or, if you are on a call driving home and you get in range of the microcell does it then flip the call to the microcell without dropping the call?

    Thanks-

    Jason

  33. I had a question about the pricing for current att dsl and voice subscribers.. I called my att store today and they said the unlimited plan is 20 bucks a month regardless of weather or not you have internet or voice through att. I would be very interested in this device if I could get the unlimited plan for free. Anyone heard this?

    Thanks
    Andrew

  34. Great review, thanks. I got rid of my 3G iPhone a couple of years ago when I moved to the cellular dead zone known as Chapel Hill. I’m heading out to AT&T to get a Microcell and iPhone 3GS right now.

    Thanks.

  35. Excellent review, thanks for your time. I have the same issues that you do. Now that these are available in Atlanta I’m going to pick one up.

  36. I had the same problem with my in house signal. I could walk down the street and get a great signal though. This was both with Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint. Finding a good service has been an issue the past 2yrs of me living in North Carolina. I finally have just stuck with AT&T. I was first purchased a repeater, I got 4 bars when standing with in 2 inches of it but I would still get dropped calls both with Verizon and AT&T. I now own the Microcell…Although before we used to just get that “You have a new voice mail” without the phone even ringing. Now we just get dropped calls, very frustrating after spending $50 on a repeater and now $150 on the Mircocell. We always have 4-5 bars anywhere in the house, but now for no reason the call drops. I wouldn’t care but I am currently deployed with the military, it takes me several minutes to get through to my wife and after a 2 minute conversation our call drops. Very VERY dissappointing….not sure what else we can do to help the issue.

  37. the GPS antenna is not for marketing or preventing its use in Europe/elsewhere. There are more effective ways to do that. The GPS is for E911 reporting. THe law requires reporting the location of the cell site to 911 emergency services. Can’t do that without a gps antenna.

  38. Finally came to my area (S.NH), and I convinced myself to try it. I’m in worst-case geography in some respects. I’m pretty sure I have three towers nearby. Two are just over the ridge from my house (my house is about 50′ down from the peak of a small hill). Both are pretty close—2-3 miles and I’m fairly certain they are 3G. The third has direct line of sight across a valley, but is more like 6 miles away. I think that one is still EDGE.

    When the phone can get a lock on one of the closer towers, performance is acceptable. But my theory is that sometimes the phone will pick the far tower, and then it all goes to hell. I’m guessing that the other two majors (Verizon, Sprint) have sites on the same towers, as performance on those carriers is about the same at the house as with At&t.

    Over the years I have spent countless hours and about $2K on repeater technology. My outside antenna is 15′ above the roof with 9dB of gain, which feeds a repeater with enough power to (allegedly) light up a 15,000 sq ft warehouse. This feeds two “donor” antennas inside the house. Even with all that, you can only get solid performance if you get within 10′ of a donor. Better than before, but still frustrating. And, of course, would always decide to get flakey on nights and weekends when my Physician wife was on call. Grrrrrr….

    So enter the Microcell. I have it in the center on the 1st floor of a two story house. GPS locked no problem. The unit activated in about 30min. Boom, “AT&T M-Cell” shows up on my iPhone 3GS as well as my wife’s iPhone 4. Five bars. Drops to three if you try hard enough to go to a far corner, but works just as well. Outside it drops off pretty fast then hands off to a regular tower, but outside signal was always decent so no surprise it would start favoring the local towers over the dwindling Microcell’s signal.

    Call quality is solid. Just got it this weekend so we’ll see if I start running into drops or call failures. I’m a bit wary given my armchair theories that there are strong towers but don’t always “win” the site selection. In that case the Microcell could become just another contendor in the ring. Time will tell.

    As to the naysayers—I see their point. But the practical consideration for most folks is that this is often the best option. Repeators are nice in theory, but I sure couldn’t get that to be reliable enough, and not for lack of money and effort. Do I wish the Microcell was cheaper—hell yeah. But $150 is a paltry sum to fix what has been a major pain point around here. Let’s hope works well in the long term.

  39. I’m so fed up with the microcell’s problems I’ve registered 3gmicrocellsucks.com.

  40. Does using the microcell slow down the high-speed internet connection it’s connected to? My housemate works from home and needs fast internet for sending/receiving large files (mapping, imagery, etc), and I need to be sure it will not interfere with her work. Thanks! ;)
    Ann

    • No. The Microcell doesn’t seem to use much bandwidth BUT it is voice so you don’t want to be on a call and hammering your connection with a big download either. You’ll notice it.

  41. This looks like a brilliant marketing strategy for AT&T. Instead of investing to populate dead signal zones with picocells, they promote a widget called 3G MicroCell and let the customers PAY for it. For those of you who have been to Japan where 3G is now the norm, even subways and underground walks are covered and you always get great signal reception. Use your VOIP in through your laptop or PC and turn your cell off when you’re at home if you get poor or no reception at all. Let AT&T invest on better infrastructure rather than bilking its customers with more charges for useless widgets.

  42. Sorry if I missed this… I have AT&T DSL right now and the Microcell (which works great). If I get rid of AT&T DSL and my home phone, will the Microcell still function when I have a different (i.e., non-AT&T) internet provider?

  43. Yes. Since getting my Microcell I’ve moved from AT&T Uverse to Time Warner Wideband. It’s working just fine.

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  13. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works | adamwhiles dot com - [...] appeared on Engadget on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]
  14. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works | Splish/Splash/Mash - [...] appeared on Engadget Mobile on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email …
  15. TechTrance.net – Where Technology is a Passion » Blog Archive » AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works - [...] appeared on Engadget on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments …
  16. Its All About A Digital Technology » Blog Archive » AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  17. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works | 1stop2all.com - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  18. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works | SamsungDataCables - [...] appeared on Engadget Mobile on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email …
  19. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works | eMediaOne - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Share this: [...]
  20. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works – ComputerUser.ca - [...] appeared on Engadget on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]
  21. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works | Web Buzz - [...] appeared on Engadget on Tue, 22 Sep 2009 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments …
  22. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottian: yes, it works | Cell Phone Magazine | Your daily online mobile guide - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  23. Its All About A Digital Technology » Blog Archive » AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  24. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works - [...] Read?|?Permalink?|?Email this?|?Comments [...]
  25. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works | Games, it's what we all about - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  26. AT&T’s 3G MicroCell tested and reviewed by Charlottean: yes, it works | Cell Phone Magazine | Your daily online mobile guide - [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]
  27. AT&T 3G Microcell reviewed, liked - [...] JohnNash] Share [...]
  28. AT&T 3G Microcell reviewed, liked | mowbee.com - [...] [Via: JohnNash] [...]
  29. Top Posts « WordPress.com - [...] Review of the AT&T 3G MicroCell As reported here and here AT&T released their new 3G MicroCell yesterday …
  30. Techpedition » Blog Archive » Episode 036 – VDD - [...] ATT Testing 3G Microcell [...]
  31. AT&T launches 3G femtocell in Charlotte N.C. « 3G In The Home - [...] Users can verify that they are using the femtocell (and therefore getting free calls) by looking for the “AT&T …
  32. Carl’s Blog » Blog Archive » 1st Review published on 3G Microcell in Charlotte - [...] http://jasonnash.wordpress.com/2009/09/22/review-of-the-att-3g-microcell/ [...]
  33. Femtocell market update for week of 5 October 2009 « 3G In The Home - [...] looks like AT&T has done very little so far by way of promotion.  Jason Nash (who provided one of …
  34. Tacticool Review: The Magpul iPhone Case « Jason Nash’s Blog - [...] of “unboxing” reviews or Day 1 reviews.  About the only time I’ve done that was my review of the AT&T …
  35. Techpedition » Blog Archive » Episode 036 – VDD - [...] ATT Testing 3G Microcell [...]

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